Cyberbullying

  • January is Cyberbullying Awareness in Rockwall ISD

    What is Cyberbullying?

    Cyberbullying can create a disruptive environment at school and is often related to in-person bullying. Cyberbullying is when a child, preteen or teen is tormented, threatened, harassed, humiliated, embarrassed or otherwise targeted by another child, preteen or teen using the Internet, interactive and digital technologies or mobile phones.

    RISD Student Handbook: Bullying is when a student or group of students engages in written or verbal expression, expression through electronic means, or physical conduct that occurs on school property, at a school-sponsored or school-related activity, or in a vehicle operated by the District, and a school district’s board of trustees or the board’s designee determines that the behavior:

    1. Has the effect or will have the effect of physically harming a student, damaging a student’s property, or placing a student in reasonable fear of harm to the student’s person or of damage to the student’s property; or
    2. Is sufficiently severe, persistent, and pervasive enough that the action or threat creates an intimidating, threatening, or abusive educational environment for a student.

    This conduct is considered bullying if it:

    1. Exploits an imbalance of power between the student perpetrator who is engaging in bullying and the student victim through written or verbal expression or physical conduct; and
    2. Interferes with a student’s education or substantially disrupts the operation of a school.

    All incidents of bullying should be reported either online at Bullying Report or to school administration for investigation.

    A copy of the district’s policy is available in the principal’s office, superintendent’s office, and on the district website.

    If a student believes that he or she has experienced bullying, or has witnesses bullying of another student, it is important for the student or parent to notify a teacher, counselor, principal, or another district employee as soon as possible. The administration will investigate any allegations of bullying and will take appropriate disciplinary action if an investigation indicates bullying has occurred. Disciplinary or other action may be taken even if the conduct did not rise to the level of bullying. Any retaliation against a student who reports an incident of bullying is prohibited.

    RISD Board Policy – Student Welfare Freedom from Discrimination, Harassment, and Retaliation, FFH (Local): The District prohibits discrimination, including harassment, against any student on the basis of race, color, religion, gender, national origin, disability, or any other basis prohibited by law. The District prohibits dating violence, as defined by this policy. Retaliation against anyone involved in the complaint process is a violation of District policy. Discrimination against a student is defined as conduct directed at a student on the basis of race, color, religion, gender, national origin, disability, or on any other basis prohibited by law, that adversely affects the student.

    RISD Board Policy – Student Welfare Freedom from Bullying, FFI (Local): The District prohibits bullying as defined by this policy. Retaliation against anyone involved in the complaint process is a violation of District policy. Retaliation against anyone involved in the complaint process is a violation of District policy. Bullying is when a student or group of students engages in written or verbal expression, expression through electronic means, or physical conduct that occurs on school property, at a school-sponsored or school-related activity, or in a vehicle operated by the District, and a school district’s board of trustees or the board’s designee determines that the behavior:

    1. Has the effect or will have the effect of physically harming a student, damaging a student’s property, or placing a student in reasonable fear of harm to the student’s person or of damage to the student’s property; or
    2. Is sufficiently severe, persistent, and pervasive enough that the action or threat creates an intimidating, threatening, or abusive educational environment for a student.

    This conduct is considered bullying if it:

    1. Exploits an imbalance of power between the student perpetrator who is engaging in bullying and the student victim through written or verbal expression or physical conduct; and
    2. Interferes with a student’s education or substantially disrupts the operation of a school.

    All incidents of bullying should be reported either online at http://www.rockwallisd.com/students/general/resources/bullying-report/ or to school administration for investigation.

    A copy of the district’s policy is available in the principal’s office, superintendent’s office, and on the district website.

    According to the 2010 Pew Internet and American Life Project, of the 75% of teens who own cell phones, 87% use text messaging at least occasionally. Among those teen texters:

    • Half of teens send 50 or more text messages a day, or 1,500 texts a month, and one in three send more than 100 texts a day, or more than 3,000 texts a month.
    • 15% of teens who are texters send more than 200 texts a day, or more than 6,000 texts a month.
    • Boys typically send and receive 30 texts a day; girls typically send and receive 80 messages per day.
    • Teen texters ages 12-13 typically send and receive 20 texts a day.
    • 14-17 year-old texters typically send and receive 60 text messages a day.
    • Older girls who text are the most active, with 14-17 year-old girls typically sending 100 or more messages a day or more than 3,000 texts a month.
    • However, while many teens are avid texters, a substantial minority are not. One-fifth of teen texters (22%) send and receive just one to 10 texts a day or 30 to 300 texts a month.

    Source: Teens, Cell Phones and Texting Text Messaging Becomes Centerpiece Communications